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NGC 1499 California Nebula


scott pellet
 

Details are as follows:
Date Images Acquired: November 18, 2020
All sub-frames at 240 seconds, 15 Lum, 10 R, 10 G, 10 B
Scope : 6" Astro-Physics EDFS, normally at f/5, but focal reduced to f/3.75, which is a FL=813 mm
Camera QSI 683 ws-8
Focuser and Field Rotator: WR35 Moonlite Nitecrawler
Mount: Astro-Physics 1200 GTO w/ CP3 controller
Guide Scope: Astro-Physics 80mm f/11.25
Guide Camera: ZWO ASI 120 MM-S
Acquisition software: Sequence Generator Pro
Guiding software: PHD2
Post-Processed using PixInsight

This object is big.  Even at this short focal length, I could only capture a portion of it.  This is one of only about 3 objects that a Hydrogen Beta filter is helpful for visually observing.  I do not have and HB filter for astro-imaging.  Next time I image it. I will include Hydrogen Alpha filtered data.

From Wikipedia:

The California Nebula (NGC 1499) is an emission nebula located in the constellation Perseus. It is so named because it appears to resemble the outline of the US State of California on long exposure photographs. It is almost 2.5° long on the sky and, because of its very low surface brightness, it is extremely difficult to observe visually. It can be observed with a Hα filter (isolates the Hα line at 656 nm) or Hβ filter (isolates the Hβ line at 486 nm) in a rich-field telescope under dark skies.[1] It lies at a distance of about 1,000 light years from Earth. Its fluorescence is due to excitation of the Hβ line in the nebula by the nearby prodigiously energetic O7 star, Xi Persei 

The California Nebula was discovered by E. E. Barnard in 1884

 


Robert Pitt
 

Beautiful Scott!

 

From: main@bas-astro.groups.io <main@bas-astro.groups.io> On Behalf Of scott pellet
Sent: Monday, January 11, 2021 5:52 PM
To: main@bas-astro.groups.io
Subject: [bas-astro] NGC 1499 California Nebula

 

Details are as follows:
Date Images Acquired: November 18, 2020
All sub-frames at 240 seconds, 15 Lum, 10 R, 10 G, 10 B
Scope : 6" Astro-Physics EDFS, normally at f/5, but focal reduced to f/3.75, which is a FL=813 mm
Camera QSI 683 ws-8
Focuser and Field Rotator: WR35 Moonlite Nitecrawler
Mount: Astro-Physics 1200 GTO w/ CP3 controller
Guide Scope: Astro-Physics 80mm f/11.25
Guide Camera: ZWO ASI 120 MM-S
Acquisition software: Sequence Generator Pro
Guiding software: PHD2
Post-Processed using PixInsight

This object is big.  Even at this short focal length, I could only capture a portion of it.  This is one of only about 3 objects that a Hydrogen Beta filter is helpful for visually observing.  I do not have and HB filter for astro-imaging.  Next time I image it. I will include Hydrogen Alpha filtered data.

From Wikipedia:

The California Nebula (NGC 1499) is an emission nebula located in the constellation Perseus. It is so named because it appears to resemble the outline of the US State of California on long exposure photographs. It is almost 2.5° long on the sky and, because of its very low surface brightness, it is extremely difficult to observe visually. It can be observed with a Hα filter (isolates the Hα line at 656 nm) or Hβ filter (isolates the Hβ line at 486 nm) in a rich-field telescope under dark skies.[1] It lies at a distance of about 1,000 light years from Earth. Its fluorescence is due to excitation of the Hβ line in the nebula by the nearby prodigiously energetic O7 star, Xi Persei 

The California Nebula was discovered by E. E. Barnard in 1884

 

Attachments:


Bob Sieber
 

Scott, thanks for sharing.  Excellent work.  Glad you are having fun.

All the best,

 

Bob

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: scott pellet
Sent: Monday, January 11, 2021 5:52 PM
Subject: [bas-astro] NGC 1499 California Nebula

 

Details are as follows:
Date Images Acquired: November 18, 2020
All sub-frames at 240 seconds, 15 Lum, 10 R, 10 G, 10 B
Scope : 6" Astro-Physics EDFS, normally at f/5, but focal reduced to f/3.75, which is a FL=813 mm
Camera QSI 683 ws-8
Focuser and Field Rotator: WR35 Moonlite Nitecrawler
Mount: Astro-Physics 1200 GTO w/ CP3 controller
Guide Scope: Astro-Physics 80mm f/11.25
Guide Camera: ZWO ASI 120 MM-S
Acquisition software: Sequence Generator Pro
Guiding software: PHD2
Post-Processed using PixInsight

This object is big.  Even at this short focal length, I could only capture a portion of it.  This is one of only about 3 objects that a Hydrogen Beta filter is helpful for visually observing.  I do not have and HB filter for astro-imaging.  Next time I image it. I will include Hydrogen Alpha filtered data.

From Wikipedia:

The California Nebula (NGC 1499) is an emission nebula located in the constellation Perseus. It is so named because it appears to resemble the outline of the US State of California on long exposure photographs. It is almost 2.5° long on the sky and, because of its very low surface brightness, it is extremely difficult to observe visually. It can be observed with a Hα filter (isolates the Hα line at 656 nm) or Hβ filter (isolates the Hβ line at 486 nm) in a rich-field telescope under dark skies.[1] It lies at a distance of about 1,000 light years from Earth. Its fluorescence is due to excitation of the Hβ line in the nebula by the nearby prodigiously energetic O7 star, Xi Persei 

The California Nebula was discovered by E. E. Barnard in 1884

 

Attachments:

 


James Moore
 

That is beautiful, Scott! Thanks for sharing. 


Fred Rains
 

Scott,

This is a great image! Do you mind if we post it on the Club Facebook page?

Thanks and Happy New Year,

Fred

On Monday, January 11, 2021, 05:52:31 PM CST, scott pellet <shpellet@...> wrote:


Details are as follows:
Date Images Acquired: November 18, 2020
All sub-frames at 240 seconds, 15 Lum, 10 R, 10 G, 10 B
Scope : 6" Astro-Physics EDFS, normally at f/5, but focal reduced to f/3.75, which is a FL=813 mm
Camera QSI 683 ws-8
Focuser and Field Rotator: WR35 Moonlite Nitecrawler
Mount: Astro-Physics 1200 GTO w/ CP3 controller
Guide Scope: Astro-Physics 80mm f/11.25
Guide Camera: ZWO ASI 120 MM-S
Acquisition software: Sequence Generator Pro
Guiding software: PHD2
Post-Processed using PixInsight

This object is big.  Even at this short focal length, I could only capture a portion of it.  This is one of only about 3 objects that a Hydrogen Beta filter is helpful for visually observing.  I do not have and HB filter for astro-imaging.  Next time I image it. I will include Hydrogen Alpha filtered data.

From Wikipedia:

The California Nebula (NGC 1499) is an emission nebula located in the constellation Perseus. It is so named because it appears to resemble the outline of the US State of California on long exposure photographs. It is almost 2.5° long on the sky and, because of its very low surface brightness, it is extremely difficult to observe visually. It can be observed with a Hα filter (isolates the Hα line at 656 nm) or Hβ filter (isolates the Hβ line at 486 nm) in a rich-field telescope under dark skies.[1] It lies at a distance of about 1,000 light years from Earth. Its fluorescence is due to excitation of the Hβ line in the nebula by the nearby prodigiously energetic O7 star, Xi Persei 

The California Nebula was discovered by E. E. Barnard in 1884

 

Attachments: