Nova Cassiopeia 2021


Myron Wasiuta
 

Hi,

A nova has been discovered in Cassiopeia near M52. This morning it was about mag 7.7. Here is a link for more information, and some spectra we obtained this morning at MSRO. https://britastro.org/node/25814

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA


Robert Pitt
 

Thanks Myron! Hope to see it on next clear night. By the way, I donated a older SBIG self-guiding spectrograph to BAS a month or so ago. If you want it, you may be able to contact Fred to ask for it.
Regards,
Bob

-----------------------------------------

From: "Myron Wasiuta"
To: "Bart Billard", "Linda Billard", "Glenn Faini", "Jerry Hubbell", "Lauren Lennon", "Shannon Morgan"
Cc:
Sent: Sunday March 21 2021 1:53:37PM
Subject: [bas-astro] Nova Cassiopeia 2021

Hi,

A nova has been discovered in Cassiopeia near M52. This morning it was about mag 7.7. Here is a link for more information, and some spectra we obtained this morning at MSRO. https://britastro.org/node/25814

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA
INBOX30304979a93f2ba2ee458101756dd27b24c


Sterling DeRamus
 

Nothing shows up in Stellarium at that precise location, but there’s a rich star field around it.  Here are two screen shots.  One is obviously more zoomed in than the other.


On Mar 21, 2021, at 3:50 PM, Robert Pitt <rpittal@...> wrote:

Thanks Myron! Hope to see it on next clear night. By the way, I donated a older SBIG self-guiding spectrograph to BAS a month or so ago. If you want it, you may be able to contact Fred to ask for it.
Regards,
Bob

-----------------------------------------

From: "Myron Wasiuta"
To: "Bart Billard", "Linda Billard", "Glenn Faini", "Jerry Hubbell", "Lauren Lennon", "Shannon Morgan"
Cc:
Sent: Sunday March 21 2021 1:53:37PM
Subject: [bas-astro] Nova Cassiopeia 2021

Hi,

A nova has been discovered in Cassiopeia near M52. This morning it was about mag 7.7. Here is a link for more information, and some spectra we obtained this morning at MSRO. https://britastro.org/node/25814

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA
INBOX30304979a93f2ba2ee458101756dd27b24c


Myron Wasiuta
 

Hi Bob,
If that spectrograph is something the BAS wont need or use, we could definitely put it in service. It would allow for higher resolution data than we can get now. In fact we have a telescope that we could dedicate to spectroscopy with that instrument ( a 12- inch LX-200). In fact, we could make this telescope a joint BAS/ MSRO instrument that coyld be available to members of both groups. Just a thought but i think it would be a really cool project!

Dr. Myron Wasiuta
President- MSRO Science, Inc
Director- Mark Slade Remote Observatory 
Wilderness, VA USA


On Mar 21, 2021, at 5:57 PM, Sterling DeRamus <sterling.deramus@...> wrote:

Nothing shows up in Stellarium at that precise location, but there’s a rich star field around it.  Here are two screen shots.  One is obviously more zoomed in than the other.


On Mar 21, 2021, at 3:50 PM, Robert Pitt <rpittal@...> wrote:

Thanks Myron! Hope to see it on next clear night. By the way, I donated a older SBIG self-guiding spectrograph to BAS a month or so ago. If you want it, you may be able to contact Fred to ask for it.
Regards,
Bob

-----------------------------------------

From: "Myron Wasiuta"
To: "Bart Billard", "Linda Billard", "Glenn Faini", "Jerry Hubbell", "Lauren Lennon", "Shannon Morgan"
Cc:
Sent: Sunday March 21 2021 1:53:37PM
Subject: [bas-astro] Nova Cassiopeia 2021

Hi,

A nova has been discovered in Cassiopeia near M52. This morning it was about mag 7.7. Here is a link for more information, and some spectra we obtained this morning at MSRO. https://britastro.org/node/25814

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA
INBOX30304979a93f2ba2ee458101756dd27b24c

Attachments:


Mark Copper
 

Thanks for the graphic and the link. Any guidance as to what in the spectrum makes this a "classical nova"?


Sterling DeRamus
 

https://astronomy.com/news/observing/2021/03/observe-theres-a-new-nova-visible-in-cassiopeia

This article indicates that it is white dwarf that is stealing matter from a companion.  It went thermonuclear, but not enough to go supernova.  That it is suddenly visible where nothing was known before, must mean that it is very far away.  It goes to show us that a supernova is likely to be a surprise star, not one we’re expecting.


On Mar 21, 2021, at 7:01 PM, Mark Copper <mlcopper@...> wrote:

Thanks for the graphic and the link. Any guidance as to what in the spectrum makes this a "classical nova"?


Myron Wasiuta
 

Hi Mark,
What makes this a “Classical Nova” is not a feature in its spectrum but in the fact this star has never before been seen to outburst. It is undoubtedly a cataclysmic variable where a white dwarf and a larger evolved star orbit in close proximity so that mass transfer is occurring. In tbis case we have not seen a previous eruption though there may have been previous ones thousands or tens of thousands of years ago.  Another difference between a “ normal” cataclysmic variable and a classic nova is the range of brightness of the outburst and energy involved. This should be a really cool object to observe over the next few weeks. 

Dr. Myron Wasiuta
President- MSRO Science, Inc
Director- Mark Slade Remote Observatory 
Wilderness, VA USA


On Mar 21, 2021, at 8:01 PM, Mark Copper <mlcopper@...> wrote:

Thanks for the graphic and the link. Any guidance as to what in the spectrum makes this a "classical nova"?


Sterling DeRamus
 



Here is the light curve for the 2013 Nova in Delphinus.  Note how fast it peaked at about 4.4 after just a few days.  This one started out brighter so it might peak at Mag 3.  Too bad the moon and Cassiopeia are not in the best spot for observing this.

On Mar 21, 2021, at 7:01 PM, Mark Copper <mlcopper@...> wrote:

Thanks for the graphic and the link. Any guidance as to what in the spectrum makes this a "classical nova"?