RS Oph in outburst


Myron Wasiuta
 

Hello,

Battling blood-sucking swarms of mosquitoes and sauna-like humidity, I managed to get an image of RS Oph in outburst last night as well as a spectra. For this image I combined 10 60-sec exposures made using photometric B,V, and R filters, then treated those images as RGB. The pink H-Alpha emission is evident in the color of the star.The telescope I used  is a 10-inch RC with QHY 174 GPS camera at 1980mm fl ( our MSRO Station 2 telescope) which gives 0.6arc-sec/pixel. I estimated visual magnitude to be close to 6.0. Its last outburst was in 2/2006,and the one before that was in 1985. These recurrent novae are among the rarest of stars in our galaxy-only 9 other are known ( T Pyx and T CrB are the most famous of these remaining nine).

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA


Sterling DeRamus
 

Cool.  I was looking at that area of the sky on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th of August.  I imaged the area on the 4th in a 30 second wide field. It’s attached.  It was just on a tripod so when you zoom in on it there are trails. But I wonder if the star is visible.  

One thing I’ve never understood is how recurrent novas don’t become Type I supernovas or vice versa, how type I’s don’t blow off enough material to stop them from exceeding the Chandrasekhar limit. 


On Aug 13, 2021, at 9:02 PM, Myron Wasiuta <mwasiuta@...> wrote:



Hello,

Battling blood-sucking swarms of mosquitoes and sauna-like humidity, I managed to get an image of RS Oph in outburst last night as well as a spectra. For this image I combined 10 60-sec exposures made using photometric B,V, and R filters, then treated those images as RGB. The pink H-Alpha emission is evident in the color of the star.The telescope I used  is a 10-inch RC with QHY 174 GPS camera at 1980mm fl ( our MSRO Station 2 telescope) which gives 0.6arc-sec/pixel. I estimated visual magnitude to be close to 6.0. Its last outburst was in 2/2006,and the one before that was in 1985. These recurrent novae are among the rarest of stars in our galaxy-only 9 other are known ( T Pyx and T CrB are the most famous of these remaining nine).

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA
<d43f662d.png>
<RS Oph 081321 0045UTannotated.jpg>


Myron Wasiuta
 

Hi Sterling,
I looked carefully at you image and i do believe it just barely detects RS Oph while still near minimum. The nova event occurred on August 8 but your image confirms it was at or very near its quiescent state on the night of the 4 th. I can send you an annotated version of your image showing the location of RS once i get home from work. 
Hope all is well in Alabama. I miss the stargazing daysi had with the BAS years ago!

Dr. Myron Wasiuta
President- MSRO Science, Inc
Director- Mark Slade Remote Observatory 
Wilderness, VA USA


On Aug 14, 2021, at 10:05 AM, Sterling DeRamus <sterling.deramus@...> wrote:

Cool.  I was looking at that area of the sky on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th of August.  I imaged the area on the 4th in a 30 second wide field. It’s attached.  It was just on a tripod so when you zoom in on it there are trails. But I wonder if the star is visible.  

One thing I’ve never understood is how recurrent novas don’t become Type I supernovas or vice versa, how type I’s don’t blow off enough material to stop them from exceeding the Chandrasekhar limit. 


On Aug 13, 2021, at 9:02 PM, Myron Wasiuta <mwasiuta@...> wrote:



Hello,

Battling blood-sucking swarms of mosquitoes and sauna-like humidity, I managed to get an image of RS Oph in outburst last night as well as a spectra. For this image I combined 10 60-sec exposures made using photometric B,V, and R filters, then treated those images as RGB. The pink H-Alpha emission is evident in the color of the star.The telescope I used  is a 10-inch RC with QHY 174 GPS camera at 1980mm fl ( our MSRO Station 2 telescope) which gives 0.6arc-sec/pixel. I estimated visual magnitude to be close to 6.0. Its last outburst was in 2/2006,and the one before that was in 1985. These recurrent novae are among the rarest of stars in our galaxy-only 9 other are known ( T Pyx and T CrB are the most famous of these remaining nine).

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA
<d43f662d.png>
<RS Oph 081321 0045UTannotated.jpg>

Attachments:


Sterling DeRamus
 

Thanks, Myron!  I’m not sure if I did.  I looked, but it’s hard to tell where I am exactly, but I would be surprised to find an 11 magnitude star in such a wide field.  I used ISO 800 for the shot.


On Aug 14, 2021, at 12:24 PM, Myron Wasiuta <mwasiuta@...> wrote:

Hi Sterling,
I looked carefully at you image and i do believe it just barely detects RS Oph while still near minimum. The nova event occurred on August 8 but your image confirms it was at or very near its quiescent state on the night of the 4 th. I can send you an annotated version of your image showing the location of RS once i get home from work. 
Hope all is well in Alabama. I miss the stargazing daysi had with the BAS years ago!

Dr. Myron Wasiuta
President- MSRO Science, Inc
Director- Mark Slade Remote Observatory 
Wilderness, VA USA


On Aug 14, 2021, at 10:05 AM, Sterling DeRamus <sterling.deramus@...> wrote:

Cool.  I was looking at that area of the sky on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th of August.  I imaged the area on the 4th in a 30 second wide field. It’s attached.  It was just on a tripod so when you zoom in on it there are trails. But I wonder if the star is visible.  

One thing I’ve never understood is how recurrent novas don’t become Type I supernovas or vice versa, how type I’s don’t blow off enough material to stop them from exceeding the Chandrasekhar limit. 


On Aug 13, 2021, at 9:02 PM, Myron Wasiuta <mwasiuta@...> wrote:



Hello,

Battling blood-sucking swarms of mosquitoes and sauna-like humidity, I managed to get an image of RS Oph in outburst last night as well as a spectra. For this image I combined 10 60-sec exposures made using photometric B,V, and R filters, then treated those images as RGB. The pink H-Alpha emission is evident in the color of the star.The telescope I used  is a 10-inch RC with QHY 174 GPS camera at 1980mm fl ( our MSRO Station 2 telescope) which gives 0.6arc-sec/pixel. I estimated visual magnitude to be close to 6.0. Its last outburst was in 2/2006,and the one before that was in 1985. These recurrent novae are among the rarest of stars in our galaxy-only 9 other are known ( T Pyx and T CrB are the most famous of these remaining nine).

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA
<d43f662d.png>
<RS Oph 081321 0045UTannotated.jpg>

Attachments:


Sterling DeRamus
 


Here’s another shot on the third at 6400 ISO.  


On Aug 14, 2021, at 3:02 PM, Sterling DeRamus via groups.io <sterling.deramus@...> wrote:

Thanks, Myron!  I’m not sure if I did.  I looked, but it’s hard to tell where I am exactly, but I would be surprised to find an 11 magnitude star in such a wide field.  I used ISO 800 for the shot.


On Aug 14, 2021, at 12:24 PM, Myron Wasiuta <mwasiuta@...> wrote:

Hi Sterling,
I looked carefully at you image and i do believe it just barely detects RS Oph while still near minimum. The nova event occurred on August 8 but your image confirms it was at or very near its quiescent state on the night of the 4 th. I can send you an annotated version of your image showing the location of RS once i get home from work. 
Hope all is well in Alabama. I miss the stargazing daysi had with the BAS years ago!

Dr. Myron Wasiuta
President- MSRO Science, Inc
Director- Mark Slade Remote Observatory 
Wilderness, VA USA


On Aug 14, 2021, at 10:05 AM, Sterling DeRamus <sterling.deramus@...> wrote:

Cool.  I was looking at that area of the sky on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th of August.  I imaged the area on the 4th in a 30 second wide field. It’s attached.  It was just on a tripod so when you zoom in on it there are trails. But I wonder if the star is visible.  

One thing I’ve never understood is how recurrent novas don’t become Type I supernovas or vice versa, how type I’s don’t blow off enough material to stop them from exceeding the Chandrasekhar limit. 


On Aug 13, 2021, at 9:02 PM, Myron Wasiuta <mwasiuta@...> wrote:



Hello,

Battling blood-sucking swarms of mosquitoes and sauna-like humidity, I managed to get an image of RS Oph in outburst last night as well as a spectra. For this image I combined 10 60-sec exposures made using photometric B,V, and R filters, then treated those images as RGB. The pink H-Alpha emission is evident in the color of the star.The telescope I used  is a 10-inch RC with QHY 174 GPS camera at 1980mm fl ( our MSRO Station 2 telescope) which gives 0.6arc-sec/pixel. I estimated visual magnitude to be close to 6.0. Its last outburst was in 2/2006,and the one before that was in 1985. These recurrent novae are among the rarest of stars in our galaxy-only 9 other are known ( T Pyx and T CrB are the most famous of these remaining nine).

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA
<d43f662d.png>
<RS Oph 081321 0045UTannotated.jpg>

Attachments:


Myron Wasiuta
 

Sterling,
Its just out of the top edge of the frame on the second image. 😞
Myron

Dr. Myron Wasiuta
President- MSRO Science, Inc
Director- Mark Slade Remote Observatory 
Wilderness, VA USA


On Aug 14, 2021, at 4:04 PM, Sterling DeRamus <sterling.deramus@...> wrote:



Here’s another shot on the third at 6400 ISO.  


On Aug 14, 2021, at 3:02 PM, Sterling DeRamus via groups.io <sterling.deramus@...> wrote:

Thanks, Myron!  I’m not sure if I did.  I looked, but it’s hard to tell where I am exactly, but I would be surprised to find an 11 magnitude star in such a wide field.  I used ISO 800 for the shot.


On Aug 14, 2021, at 12:24 PM, Myron Wasiuta <mwasiuta@...> wrote:

Hi Sterling,
I looked carefully at you image and i do believe it just barely detects RS Oph while still near minimum. The nova event occurred on August 8 but your image confirms it was at or very near its quiescent state on the night of the 4 th. I can send you an annotated version of your image showing the location of RS once i get home from work. 
Hope all is well in Alabama. I miss the stargazing daysi had with the BAS years ago!

Dr. Myron Wasiuta
President- MSRO Science, Inc
Director- Mark Slade Remote Observatory 
Wilderness, VA USA


On Aug 14, 2021, at 10:05 AM, Sterling DeRamus <sterling.deramus@...> wrote:

Cool.  I was looking at that area of the sky on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th of August.  I imaged the area on the 4th in a 30 second wide field. It’s attached.  It was just on a tripod so when you zoom in on it there are trails. But I wonder if the star is visible.  

One thing I’ve never understood is how recurrent novas don’t become Type I supernovas or vice versa, how type I’s don’t blow off enough material to stop them from exceeding the Chandrasekhar limit. 


On Aug 13, 2021, at 9:02 PM, Myron Wasiuta <mwasiuta@...> wrote:



Hello,

Battling blood-sucking swarms of mosquitoes and sauna-like humidity, I managed to get an image of RS Oph in outburst last night as well as a spectra. For this image I combined 10 60-sec exposures made using photometric B,V, and R filters, then treated those images as RGB. The pink H-Alpha emission is evident in the color of the star.The telescope I used  is a 10-inch RC with QHY 174 GPS camera at 1980mm fl ( our MSRO Station 2 telescope) which gives 0.6arc-sec/pixel. I estimated visual magnitude to be close to 6.0. Its last outburst was in 2/2006,and the one before that was in 1985. These recurrent novae are among the rarest of stars in our galaxy-only 9 other are known ( T Pyx and T CrB are the most famous of these remaining nine).

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA
<d43f662d.png>
<RS Oph 081321 0045UTannotated.jpg>

Attachments:

Attachments:


Robert Pitt
 

Very interesting! How long does the outburst “last” before dimming?

 

Robert Pitt, P.E., Ph.D. BCEE, D.WRE

Emeritus Cudworth Professor of Urban Water Systems

Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

The University of Alabama

Rpittal at charter dot net

 

From: main@bas-astro.groups.io <main@bas-astro.groups.io> On Behalf Of Myron Wasiuta
Sent: Friday, August 13, 2021 9:03 PM
To: raclub@groups.io; novac@...; Bart Billard <bbillard@...>; Linda Billard <lbillard@...>; Glenn Faini <gfaini@...>; Jerry Hubbell <jhubbell@...>; Lauren Lennon <llennon@...>; Shannon Morgan <smorgan@...>; main@bas-astro.groups.io
Subject: [bas-astro] RS Oph in outburst

 

Hello,

Battling blood-sucking swarms of mosquitoes and sauna-like humidity, I managed to get an image of RS Oph in outburst last night as well as a spectra. For this image I combined 10 60-sec exposures made using photometric B,V, and R filters, then treated those images as RGB. The pink H-Alpha emission is evident in the color of the star.The telescope I used  is a 10-inch RC with QHY 174 GPS camera at 1980mm fl ( our MSRO Station 2 telescope) which gives 0.6arc-sec/pixel. I estimated visual magnitude to be close to 6.0. Its last outburst was in 2/2006,and the one before that was in 1985. These recurrent novae are among the rarest of stars in our galaxy-only 9 other are known ( T Pyx and T CrB are the most famous of these remaining nine).

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA


Myron Wasiuta
 

Robert,
the star begins fading almost immediately. IIRC, in past events this star fades about 3 magnitudes in the first two weeks. 
Myron

Dr. Myron Wasiuta
President- MSRO Science, Inc
Director- Mark Slade Remote Observatory 
Wilderness, VA USA


On Aug 14, 2021, at 4:21 PM, Robert Pitt <rpittal@...> wrote:



Very interesting! How long does the outburst “last” before dimming?

 

Robert Pitt, P.E., Ph.D. BCEE, D.WRE

Emeritus Cudworth Professor of Urban Water Systems

Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

The University of Alabama

Rpittal at charter dot net

 

From: main@bas-astro.groups.io <main@bas-astro.groups.io> On Behalf Of Myron Wasiuta
Sent: Friday, August 13, 2021 9:03 PM
To: raclub@groups.io; novac@...; Bart Billard <bbillard@...>; Linda Billard <lbillard@...>; Glenn Faini <gfaini@...>; Jerry Hubbell <jhubbell@...>; Lauren Lennon <llennon@...>; Shannon Morgan <smorgan@...>; main@bas-astro.groups.io
Subject: [bas-astro] RS Oph in outburst

 

Hello,

Battling blood-sucking swarms of mosquitoes and sauna-like humidity, I managed to get an image of RS Oph in outburst last night as well as a spectra. For this image I combined 10 60-sec exposures made using photometric B,V, and R filters, then treated those images as RGB. The pink H-Alpha emission is evident in the color of the star.The telescope I used  is a 10-inch RC with QHY 174 GPS camera at 1980mm fl ( our MSRO Station 2 telescope) which gives 0.6arc-sec/pixel. I estimated visual magnitude to be close to 6.0. Its last outburst was in 2/2006,and the one before that was in 1985. These recurrent novae are among the rarest of stars in our galaxy-only 9 other are known ( T Pyx and T CrB are the most famous of these remaining nine).

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA

<image001.png>


Sterling DeRamus
 




Here is the 2006 light curve.  It should be back to almost normal in a month.


On Aug 14, 2021, at 5:46 PM, Myron Wasiuta <mwasiuta@...> wrote:

Robert,
the star begins fading almost immediately. IIRC, in past events this star fades about 3 magnitudes in the first two weeks. 
Myron

Dr. Myron Wasiuta
President- MSRO Science, Inc
Director- Mark Slade Remote Observatory 
Wilderness, VA USA


On Aug 14, 2021, at 4:21 PM, Robert Pitt <rpittal@...> wrote:



Very interesting! How long does the outburst “last” before dimming?

 

Robert Pitt, P.E., Ph.D. BCEE, D.WRE

Emeritus Cudworth Professor of Urban Water Systems

Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

The University of Alabama

Rpittal at charter dot net

 

From: main@bas-astro.groups.io <main@bas-astro.groups.io> On Behalf Of Myron Wasiuta
Sent: Friday, August 13, 2021 9:03 PM
To: raclub@groups.io; novac@...; Bart Billard <bbillard@...>; Linda Billard <lbillard@...>; Glenn Faini <gfaini@...>; Jerry Hubbell <jhubbell@...>; Lauren Lennon <llennon@...>; Shannon Morgan <smorgan@...>; main@bas-astro.groups.io
Subject: [bas-astro] RS Oph in outburst

 

Hello,

Battling blood-sucking swarms of mosquitoes and sauna-like humidity, I managed to get an image of RS Oph in outburst last night as well as a spectra. For this image I combined 10 60-sec exposures made using photometric B,V, and R filters, then treated those images as RGB. The pink H-Alpha emission is evident in the color of the star.The telescope I used  is a 10-inch RC with QHY 174 GPS camera at 1980mm fl ( our MSRO Station 2 telescope) which gives 0.6arc-sec/pixel. I estimated visual magnitude to be close to 6.0. Its last outburst was in 2/2006,and the one before that was in 1985. These recurrent novae are among the rarest of stars in our galaxy-only 9 other are known ( T Pyx and T CrB are the most famous of these remaining nine).

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA

<image001.png>


Myron Wasiuta
 

Sterling,

Enclosed is your image taken on August 4 which I annotated to show the location of RS Oph. What I thought might be a weak detection of the star at minimum is actual not so. There is a 9th magnitude star very close to RS Oph location which is in fact what was detected. So in conclusion we can say that on the night your image was take, RS was fainter than mag 9.2 ( about the limiting mag of your image in the area of RS Oph). In fact it was still at its normal 11th mag quiescent state. Thanks for sending your image-it was fun analyzing it!

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA


Robert Pitt
 

Thanks Sterling and Myron; that’s quite an outburst!

 

Robert Pitt, P.E., Ph.D. BCEE, D.WRE

Emeritus Cudworth Professor of Urban Water Systems

Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

The University of Alabama

Rpittal at charter dot net

 

From: main@bas-astro.groups.io <main@bas-astro.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sterling DeRamus
Sent: Saturday, August 14, 2021 6:05 PM
To: main@bas-astro.groups.io
Subject: Re: [bas-astro] RS Oph in outburst

 

 

Here is the 2006 light curve.  It should be back to almost normal in a month.

 



On Aug 14, 2021, at 5:46 PM, Myron Wasiuta <mwasiuta@...> wrote:

Robert,

the star begins fading almost immediately. IIRC, in past events this star fades about 3 magnitudes in the first two weeks. 

Myron

Dr. Myron Wasiuta

President- MSRO Science, Inc

Director- Mark Slade Remote Observatory 

Wilderness, VA USA

 



On Aug 14, 2021, at 4:21 PM, Robert Pitt <rpittal@...> wrote:



Very interesting! How long does the outburst “last” before dimming?

 

Robert Pitt, P.E., Ph.D. BCEE, D.WRE

Emeritus Cudworth Professor of Urban Water Systems

Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

The University of Alabama

Rpittal at charter dot net

 

From: main@bas-astro.groups.io <main@bas-astro.groups.io> On Behalf Of Myron Wasiuta
Sent: Friday, August 13, 2021 9:03 PM
To: raclub@groups.io; novac@...; Bart Billard <bbillard@...>; Linda Billard <lbillard@...>; Glenn Faini <gfaini@...>; Jerry Hubbell <jhubbell@...>; Lauren Lennon <llennon@...>; Shannon Morgan <smorgan@...>; main@bas-astro.groups.io
Subject: [bas-astro] RS Oph in outburst

 

Hello,

Battling blood-sucking swarms of mosquitoes and sauna-like humidity, I managed to get an image of RS Oph in outburst last night as well as a spectra. For this image I combined 10 60-sec exposures made using photometric B,V, and R filters, then treated those images as RGB. The pink H-Alpha emission is evident in the color of the star.The telescope I used  is a 10-inch RC with QHY 174 GPS camera at 1980mm fl ( our MSRO Station 2 telescope) which gives 0.6arc-sec/pixel. I estimated visual magnitude to be close to 6.0. Its last outburst was in 2/2006,and the one before that was in 1985. These recurrent novae are among the rarest of stars in our galaxy-only 9 other are known ( T Pyx and T CrB are the most famous of these remaining nine).

Dr. Myron E. Wasiuta
President, MSRO Science, Inc
Director, Mark Slade Remote Observatory
Wilderness, VA USA

<image001.png>